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Unread 04-30-2012, 03:40 PM   #1
surfsupl
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Default Snorting Suboxone

Interesting article .


Snorting and getting high on Suboxone effects range from sweating to overdose. You can even trigger opiate withdrawal. So, if you’re thinking about snorting Suboxone, you should know what happens.
In the interest of opioid harm reduction, we review what happens in the body while snorting Suboxone, as well as the dangers and safety concerns of snorting Suboxone. We welcome questions about snorting Suboxone at the end of this article, and will try to answer all legitimate questions with a personal reply ASAP.
Suboxone: What are you really snorting?

Suboxone is a prescription drug used to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone works by reducing opiate cravings and withdrawal symptoms. The active ingredient in Suboxone are buprenorphine hydrochloride and naloxone. Inactive ingredients may include lactose mannitol, cornstartch, povidine, citric acid, sodium citrate, magnesium stearate, acesulfame potassium, and flavoring agents. So if you snort Suboxone, you insufflate not only buprenorphine, but also these additional additives. And regardless of how you take it, Suboxone shows up on a drug test when specifically targeted.
How does snorting Suboxone affect the body?

Suboxone affects the central nervous system. By binding to opioid receptors in the brain,Suboxone has similar effects to stronger opiate painkillers, which is why it’s used to help those struggling with opiate addiction. But Suboxone effects reach a “ceiling” at doses higher than 16-32 mg. In other words, in doses higher than 16 mg, Suboxone ceases to have further effects. So taking too much Suboxone is also likely to precipitate an opiate withdrawal. However, it’s possible to abuse and become addicted to Suboxone as well. This risk of Suboxone addiction increases when you snort Suboxone to try to get high.
Snorting Suboxone side effects

Taking Suboxone can cause opiate withdrawal effects as a side effect of taking the medication. This is more likely when the medication is taken in high doses – so not only are you unlikely to experience enhanced effects by snorting Suboxone, but it could also cause you to experience unpleasant and painful withdrawals. These possible side effects of snorting Suboxone include:
  • drug cravings
  • fever
  • insomnia
  • irritability
  • stomach pain
  • sweating
Snorting Suboxone to get high

Snorting Suboxone provides a fairly lackluster “high.” Just as with any drug, when you Snort Suboxone, the action causes large amounts of buprenorphine to instantly hit the bloodstream and cross the blood-brain barrier. This instant effect is dangerous, because it causes Suboxone can place you at risk of overdose or toxicity as you try to get high. If you are tolerance of opioids, you may be less likely to overdose on Suboxone because it’s comparatively weaker than similar medications. But it’s still a risk.
Snorting Suboxone vs oral

Suboxone is only intended to be taken orally – the tablet is placed beneath the tongue and is absorbed into the bloodstream from the mouth. Oral preparations are safer than snorted Suboxone, because the dose is more controlled. Crushing and snorting Suboxone may cause a quicker onset of effects, causing almost immediate relief of opiate withdrawal symptoms. But it’s also more dangerous, especially because higher doses don’t correlate to more intense effects.
Snorting Suboxone dangers

Snorting Suboxone has some serious side effects. First, it can cause opiate withdrawal. Second, (and you may not have thought about this), snorting any drug can harm your nasal passages over time, and even spread disease if you share snorting instruments with others. Third, snorting Suboxone definitely increases the risk that you will become addicted to the medication. And, finally, when you snort Suboxone it is possible to overdose on Suboxone.
Snorting Suboxone safely

Suboxone should never be snorted. The large doses of the medication all at once won’t give you better effects versus oral administration. In fact, at doses higher than 16-32 mg, the medication reaches a “ceiling effect” and ceases to have further effects. Taking too much Suboxone is also likely to precipitate an opiate withdrawal, which is an incredibly unpleasant price to pay for a fairly lackluster “high.”
Snorting Suboxone questions

Do you still have questions about snorting Suboxone? If so, please let us know. We respond to all Suboxone questions with a personal and prompt reply.



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Unread 05-06-2012, 08:58 AM   #2
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where did you get this article?? it makes it sound like suboxone is just another opioid. I cant imagine people snorting suboxone....and if they did I hope they did get sick, because for those of us that use it as an important recovery tool, it is very important. Where in the heck do people get the idea that bupe is like taking reg. narcotics?
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Unread 05-06-2012, 09:00 PM   #3
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Ummmm.......................click the link @ bottom of article
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Unread 05-06-2012, 09:49 PM   #4
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One of the problem with why Drs do not prescribe Subutex is due to the above commentary. It can still screw your nose passgaes up but absent the naloxone precip wds is not an issue. The celing effect principle still stands. Naloxone has one purpose to prevent any other absorption methadone other than sublingual.


Despite what some Drs say it is NOT the naloxone that blocks the effects of other opiates. It is the Bupe.

Drs who say the blocking effect comes from Naloxone is either ignorant, or don't want to rx Subutex and by telling the patient Naloxone is the blocker they assume the case is closed. If they are not ignorant of the facts they are then lying to their patient's face. You can decide for yourself whether being ignorant of the facts Drs believe about the purpose of Nalxone as the blocker or whether lying to their patient is worse.

wayne
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Unread 05-09-2012, 01:00 AM   #5
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Quote:
About Addiction Blog
Addiction Blog is a network of writers and bloggers interested in new ideas and alternative therapies for the treatment of all types of addiction. If you are interested in becoming a writer for Addiction Blog Contact us
This isn't written by a reporter or someone doing research. It's someones blog, anyone can create one on that blogging network. It looks like the author copied most of the information from wikipedia and other sites. Basically nothing to see here.
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Unread 05-09-2012, 06:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gotoffmdone View Post
One of the problem with why Drs do not prescribe Subutex is due to the above commentary. It can still screw your nose passgaes up but absent the naloxone precip wds is not an issue. The celing effect principle still stands. Naloxone has one purpose to prevent any other absorption methadone other than sublingual.


Despite what some Drs say it is NOT the naloxone that blocks the effects of other opiates. It is the Bupe.

Drs who say the blocking effect comes from Naloxone is either ignorant, or don't want to rx Subutex and by telling the patient Naloxone is the blocker they assume the case is closed. If they are not ignorant of the facts they are then lying to their patient's face. You can decide for yourself whether being ignorant of the facts Drs believe about the purpose of Nalxone as the blocker or whether lying to their patient is worse.

wayne


I'm not understanding your post.
According to the paperwork that I get every month with my Suboxone meds:

"Nalxone is a narcotic antagonist that blocks the effects of narcotics and can cause severe narcotic withdrawal when injected.
Buprenorphine helps prevent withdrawal symptoms caused by stopping other opiate-type narcotics."

Can you explain then what you mean when you say:
"Its NOT the naloxone that blocks the effects of other opiates"

When I get a whole write up each month from CVS my favorit Pharmacy (ha, kidding) that says differently.

Or is Subutex and Suboxone not the same or have the same ingredients ?
Thank you
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Unread 05-09-2012, 07:21 AM   #7
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Hi Kia, it is the buprenorphine in both Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) and Subutex (buprenorphine only) that blocks other opioids from reaching the receptors. While naloxone is an opioid antagonist and will displace opioid from the receptors (such as when injected to reverse an overdose) and block opioids, it has very poor bioavailability both sublingually and in the GI tract. That makes it 'clinically insignificant' in Suboxone when taken as prescribed. If Suboxone is injected, then it can cause precipitated withdrawals.

A couple of links: "What is the Naloxone for?"
http://www.naabt.org/faq_answers.cfm?ID=64

"How Buprenorphine Works"
http://www.naabt.org/collateral/How_Bupe_Works.pdf

Hope that helps.

Nancy
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Unread 05-10-2012, 05:51 AM   #8
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Subutex doesn't even contain Naloxone, just Bupe. The Bupe is the main ingredient in terms of stopping cravings and stopping wds from other opiates. It also is responsible for the blocking effect with regard to regular opiates. That is why they recommend a person discontinue taking Subutex for several days if they are going to have a medical procedure that is going to require narcotics during and/or afterward.

Suboxone tabs or strips does the same thing because it contains the Bupe. Not the Naloxone. The Naloxone is there to dissuade IV drug users from trying to abuse the Bupe in that manner. When taken by way of IV the Naloxone has its greatest bioavailability and definitely gets into a person's system and wreaks havoc especially when taken in conjunction with the opioid Bupe or any other opiate. I am not sure if Naloxone is the same as Narcan but, if so, when used by itself it can save people from opioid overdoses. But it is never given under the tongue for that reason. It is given in IV form.

When taken correctly(sublingual) very little Naloxone is supposed to reach the brain. Though some of it must as some people have a reaction to the Naloxone. Despite such problems, most Drs still refuse to rx Subutex because they assume without the Naloxone patients with a history of drug abuse will abuse the Subutex. IMO Bupe without the Naloxone(Subutex) should be given on a case by case basis. A person with zero history of IV drug use ought to be prescribed Subutex and given the benefit of the doubt. It is easier to get Subutex prescribed if you have seen the same Dr for a long time without any medication issues such as taking more than prescribed, etc..

I am taking Subutex only because it comes in a generic and I cannot afford the brandname Suboxone. I wish I could because I am finding that taking the generic Sub is not even close to working the same as brandname Suboxone.

I am in no way an expert on Naloxone. I have just read the liturature numerous times. Listening to various Drs and getting my info from them has often just muddied the waters. But I am quite certain Bupe is the main drug for the tx of addiction/dependency to opiates, not the Naloxone. But that just makes sense. Treating a problem with opiates with an opiate is not a novel idea. It would be nice if it was the non naroctic Naloxone that was the reason why cravings were quashed and wds kept at bay. That way we could take care of our particular problem without having to take yet another drug of physical and mental dependence. Plus it would be cheaper.

wayne
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Unread 05-11-2012, 12:31 PM   #9
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hmm,ive been on sub so many yrs and just thinking of snorting sub,,which i feel absolutely no effects from,,besides what it is made for,,having no cravings for other opiates,, If i relapse while on sub,,it is like me having to hurdle over a barrior thats sayin why?,,what are you doing?,,i would have to purposely relapse w/o any cravings to do so,,id have to be crazy,,and yea,,i am,,but snorting a drug that doesnt get me high,,i dont know,,makes me think of snorting aspirin!,,Now ive never tried snorting aspirin,,but it doesnt really sound that good,,I dont know,,maybe a new user who just started may feel something for a week or two,,we all felt something in the begining,,but it goes away,,DAMMIT!,,LOL
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Unread 05-12-2012, 12:05 PM   #10
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Default about snorting suboxone...

When I started researching suboxone on the internet I found a TON of articles on snorting and even "plugging"(I didnt know what that was and had to look it up-anyone else who doesnt know its rectal injection). More then one person said snorting made the meds. last longer and it was a cost issue that had them snorting their meds, but as far as I know snorting something hits you harder but does not last longer in the body. A few said their dr TOLD them to snort it because the taste gagged them, but I cant see a dr doing telling his patient to snort a pill!
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Unread 05-12-2012, 03:18 PM   #11
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IMO, taking the medication in any fashion other than as directed is only continuing addictive actions and produces negative results in ones recovery.
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Unread 05-13-2012, 12:22 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LucaLuv View Post
When I started researching suboxone on the internet I found a TON of articles on snorting and even "plugging"(I didnt know what that was and had to look it up-anyone else who doesnt know its rectal injection). More then one person said snorting made the meds. last longer and it was a cost issue that had them snorting their meds, but as far as I know snorting something hits you harder but does not last longer in the body. A few said their dr TOLD them to snort it because the taste gagged them, but I cant see a dr doing telling his patient to snort a pill!
I think people who snort these things are feeling a massive placebo effect. Just think about it you are taking a 8mg pill which isn't a small pill it's pretty big and you are snorting it. That means you are also snorting all the fillers binders and whatever else they put in it. There is no way to guarantee you are going to snort the bupe in the pill or if you are going to snort all the fillers and binders and then the bupe gets stuck in your nose, you just aren't absorbing the maximum amount.

Now putting it up your butt might be just as effective as under the tongue. They do make medications that are taken that way. I haven't snorted sub and i'm definitely not sticking it up my ass. I think the reason people snort sub is for a few reasons, they are still trying to get high/are still in active addiction and a persons mind tells them that snorting sub works much better when it's proven that it dosen't.
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