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Unread 11-03-2008, 03:47 PM   #1
trish
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Default Naltrexone vs Suboxone

Hi everyone,
I have a new psychiatrist and sub doctor who seems really good. I'm not crazy about some of my symptoms from sub.. I've been on it for a while now. He suggested possibly going on Naltrexone (sp)?
Has anyone tried this before? If so what did you think of it.
and how did it compare to suboxone? I don't ever hear anyone talk about it here. I'm at work so cant type a lot.
any input would be appreciated.

trish
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Unread 11-03-2008, 04:48 PM   #2
TIM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trish View Post
Hi everyone,
I have a new psychiatrist and sub doctor who seems really good. I'm not crazy about some of my symptoms from sub.. I've been on it for a while now. He suggested possibly going on Naltrexone (sp)?
Has anyone tried this before? If so what did you think of it.
and how did it compare to suboxone? I don't ever hear anyone talk about it here. I'm at work so cant type a lot.
any input would be appreciated.

trish
Hi Trish,
Naltrexone is a opioid blocker only. Unlike suboxone it does not provide any agonist craving or withdrawal suppression. Naltrexone is a good safeguard for someone who has completed opioid addiction treatment and just wants a safegaurd prevent relapse. It was offered years ago but never became popular because of poor patient adherence. It's a good safeguard once someone is able to remain addiction free without medication who wants an added measure of insurance in case they hit a rough patch. If administered too soon in a person's treatment, PAWS can cause the patient to relapse or switch to non-opioids such as cocaine.
Tim
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Unread 11-03-2008, 09:13 PM   #3
Smith
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Hi Trish

This is just my opinion, but I think many of us here have thought about going on Neltrexone, after we completely don't need any agonist activity at all. Don't need bupe at all, don't need any assistance form a medication as far as relieving cravings, and withdrawals.
This is way different than looking at it as an alternative to bupe. It IMO is in no way an alternative to bupe any more than poking your eye out is an alternative to seeing something unpleasant.

It's your body, but If it was mine, I would for sure not start neltrexone, until I had completely stopped bupe for 30 days, and was feeling fine.

There are people who take it for alcoholism, and in those cases I don't know it might be a great idea, but for opioid misuse, it has always represented in my mind something akin to a chemical restraint. Now IMO to propose it as an alternative to buprenorphine, raises a lot of negative ethical questions.

I guess it's something for you to decide, but like Tim pointed out, Neltrexone is a complete opioid blocker, if you have any dependence on opioids It very likely will cause you to have severe and long lasting withdrawals. It could even be dangerous if you had a high tolerance to opioids. It would be like doing an ultra rapid detox, while your awake. Bupe is a partial opioid agonist-antagonist. Meaning it has some opioid effects, and can relieve withdrawal and cravings, and so on, while still provided some blockade for misusable opioids.

OK, Good luck.

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Unread 11-03-2008, 10:28 PM   #4
sunflower1776
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Default subutex?

I don't know much about subutex, but could Trish possibly not feel well naloxone in the suboxone, and could subutex be better for her than? I know that the naloxone is only in there to prevent IV use of the subs--I've read everything that has been written on this board about the naloxone in the suboxone, but for could some reason her body be reacting to it even though it's clinically insignificant? I'm just asking for my own educational purposes as well. Also, if she's not feeling well on the subs, coudl she lower her dose? How much are you on trish? I'm new at this as well, so I'm learning from others as I go along! What kind of symptoms are you having that makes your doctor want to have you possibly switch?

Last edited by sunflower1776; 11-03-2008 at 10:38 PM..
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Unread 11-03-2008, 11:42 PM   #5
gotoffmdone
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I hear the phrase low dose naltrexone mentioned a lot. For the purpose of helping the brain to produce endorphines, assuming that is the case, what dose is considered proper. I doubt my family doctor has prescribed this drug very many times, if any, and would not know the proper dose. She would be the one I would get it from if I ever went on it.

So, what does "low" dose mean? Is it under a certain mg, titrated to how much a person weighs or what?

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