About Addiction Survivors

AddictionSurvivors.org is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to providing peer support communities for those with addiction disorders and their families and friends. These forums are funded in whole by individuals whose lives have been touched by addiction in one way or another.

This forum is to discuss opioid addiction treatment, predominantly buprenorphine treatment. Separate forums are provided for introductions, contemplating treatment, induction/stabilization, ongoing treatment, tapering, post-treatment and friends and family to name a few. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider, see terms.

The focus on this forum is addiction to stimulants including cocaine/crack, amphetamines, methamphetamine, methylphenidate and MDMA (Ecstasy). NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider, see terms.


This forum focuses on Alcohol Dependence and the ramifications from it. Separate forums are provided for friends and families of the dependent person and one for the alcohol dependent person. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider, see terms.

This forum is focused on benzodiazepine addiction (Xanax, Valium, Klonopin, Atavin, Restoril, etc.). Sudden cessation of benzos could result in seizures and death, so it is vitally important to taper off of the medication. There are forums for both the addicted person and the family and friends. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider, see terms.


About Peer Support

Therapy and Peer Support are not interchangeable terms or processes. Both should be used in conjunction with, not exclusive of, each other for a full addiction-free program.

Peer support is non-healthcare provider groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous, SMART Recovery, Alanon, SOS and online discussion communities such as these. "Peer support is based on the belief that people who have faced, endured, and overcome adversity can offer useful support, encouragement, hope, and perhaps mentorship to others facing similar situations."1

Online peer support gives the patient the convenience of 24/7 access and anonymity that isn't afforded in live peer support meetings. In-person groups such as AA provides a sense of community and camaraderie and oftentimes social aspects that the patient may not have been exposed to during active addiction. Optimally, peer support of any type should be used in conjunction with professional psychosocial therapy and sometimes medication.

1. Larry Davidson, Matthew Chinman, David Sells and Michael Rowe. Peer Support Among Adults with Serious Mental Illness: A report from the Field. Schizophrenia Bulletin 2006 32(3):443-450; doi:10.1093/schbul/sbj043. February 3, 2006. http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/32/3/443